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Arts and Culture News
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    On April 15, Kim Jong-Un, the new leader of North Korea, gave his long-awaited maiden speech, on the hundredth anniversary of his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, the country’s founder. Befitting the occasion, enormous crowds attended, and male and female soldiers marched with goose-stepping precision. North Korea-watchers considered it an important moment to gauge the new... Read More »

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    Pen names have long been a means for writers to inhabit another identity—to attain privacy, assume the acceptably literate gender, or play with the freedom of a psychic unburdening. But at what point does a pseudonym become obfuscation, transgression? What happens when a poem of witness—a poem set in the aftermath of the August 6,... Read More »

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    By now, you are probably aware that J. K. Rowling wrote detective novel The Cuckoo’s Calling under the guise of Robert Galbraith, an ex-military family man. Quoth she, “It has been wonderful to publish without hype or expectation, and pure pleasure to get feedback under a different name.” Can’t imagine what anyone would stand to gain... Read More »

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    The Torpedo-GAZ, from 1951—a Soviet concept car with a tubular duraluminum skeleton. Via io9. The nineteenth century “had its own explosion of media … Much as with today’s web, people complained there was too much to read … The solution to overload? For tens of thousands of Americans, it was the scrapbook.” Authors turn to... Read More »

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    Richard Price and the evolving role of pseudonyms. From the cover of The Whites. Richard Price’s new novel, The Whites, isn’t by Richard Price, except that it is. It’s by Harry Brandt, Price’s pseudonym, but it’s also not really by Brandt—Price’s name is on the cover, too, and so Price is Brandt, obviously, and it follows... Read More »

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    At 92Y’s Unterberg Poetry Center, The Paris Review has copresented an occasional series of live conversations with writers—many of which have formed the foundations of interviews in the quarterly. Recently, 92Y and The Paris Review have made recordings of these interviews available at 92Y’s Poetry Center Online and here at The Paris Review. Consider them deleted... Read More »

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  • 04/21/16--07:30: Kill Thurber
  •      Matthew Thurber is an artist living in Brooklyn. He is the author of the graphic novels 1-800-MICE, INFOMANIACS, and Art Comic, which is forthcoming next year. “Kill Thurber” appears in Kramers Ergot 9.

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  • 08/17/16--12:14: Being Seymour Glass
  • Why I borrowed a name from Salinger.An illustration of Salinger’s “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” by Jonny Ruzzo, 2013.Ask someone who Seymour Glass is and they’ll tell you he’s a Salinger character: the eldest of the precocious Glass family, a misanthrope who shoots himself on vacation in “A Perfect Day for Bananafish.” But if that someone... Read More »

    The post Being Seymour Glass appeared first on The Paris Review.


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    From the cover of My Brilliant Friend.It’s possible you survived the whole weekend without hearing about the unmasking of Elena Ferrante, whose “true identity” (like those exist!) was revealed yesterday by some Italian guy behaving Italianly in The New York Review of Books. If you missed this story, reader—lucky you! I won’t harsh your buzz. You... Read More »

    The post That Was Not a Very Nice Thing to Do, and Other News appeared first on The Paris Review.


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  • 12/28/16--12:00: Being Seymour Glass
  • Why I borrowed a name from Salinger.

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    In today’s roundup: the greatest black woman sculptor of the twentieth century; a psychologist against empathy; and more.

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      Hilarious, possibly impervious, Joanna Ruocco is, of all the writers I know, the one who writes most purely in order to write—or so I’ve always imagined. I’ve long wanted to ask her about the impetus behind her wonderfully weird assortment of prose, so when I learned she has five books coming out this year—two last month alone—each […]

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  • 08/24/17--08:00: Degas’s Model Tells All
  •   Chrissakes, Pauline! No one would have been more horrified than Edgar Degas at the thought of a model taking up the pen. Not a fan of working-class literacy in general, he might well have died of apoplexy at the very idea that a model might dare not only to write about art but about […]